Office of Civic Innovation - Projects
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The cross-departmental Data Governance team includes 40+ Metro employees that work with data and represent every city department and has built a data-driven culture across the city, breaking down silos and fostering collaboration. The team receives trainings, creates policy, shares data, and manages open data. Members are recommended as a result of the mayor’s Open Data Executive Order (Section 3) and the Open Data Policy (3.1.2) and the team is lead by the city’s Data Officer.

Members do data analysis for their departments and across Metro, including on mobility data, LouieStat, budget and finance, crime and public safety, economic development, public works, GIS, health, the mayor’s office, and air pollution control.

Data governance analog hackathon

Data Training

Curriculum, training, and presentations for members on topics around the data lifecycle, including quality, collection, storage, metadata, visualization, business intelligence, ethics, and standards. We also have a Data Academy on beginner and advanced usage of tools like Excel, Power BI, Carto, Tableau, GIS, and other open source data visualization tools.

Our goal to institutionalize innovation has led to creating an Analog Hackathon curriculum, having an internal hackathon around Waze data, and helping organize external hackathons like Open Data Day.

Open Data

Open data, public transparency, and data-driven efforts in Louisville remain a strong and continuing priority for Mayor Greg Fischer and the Office of Civic Innovation. The Data Governance team works to release new data the public values, improve existing data sets, provide accurate metadata, and increase the frequency of data updates.

Working Groups

Each member is required to be on at least one working group, around topics like data policy, data standards (sex/gender, street addresses, race/nationality, date/time), a city-wide data inventory, data visualization, and data warehousing.

Data Inventory

The city’s official internal data inventory of data sources and data sets run by the Data Inventory Working Group. It is a critical part of our What Works Cities certification, spanning both the data inventory and data classification areas, and informs our data warehouse efforts.

Louisville Badges

The city of Louisville has a Badge reward program that allows employees to earn badges by doing data-driven and innovative work, much like the Girl Scouts. The goal is to encourage Metro employees across all agencies to learn new skills and to be better equipped to serve our citizens.